web-based experiments

HLP Lab at CUNY 2015

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We hope to see y’all at CUNY in a few weeks. In the interest of hopefully luring to some of our posters, here’s an overview of the work we’ll be presenting. In particular, we invite our reviewers, who so boldly claimed (but did not provide references for the) triviality of our work ;), to visit our posters and help us mere mortals understand.

  • Articulation and hyper-articulation
  • Unsupervised and supervised learning during speech perception
  • Syntactic priming and implicit learning during sentence comprehension
  • Uncovering the biases underlying language production through artificial language learning

Interested in more details? Read on. And, as always, I welcome feedback. (to prevent spam, first time posters are moderated; after that your posts will always directly show)

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Collect keyboard responses asynchronously in Javascript

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Some of our Mechanical Turk experiments are written in straight-up javascript, which gives you a lot of control and flexibility but at the expense of having to write some pretty basic functionality from scratch.  I recently was in a situation where I wanted to collect separate keyboard responses in different but possibly overlapping time windows: stimuli are coming in fast and on some of them, the subject needs to press the spacebar.  Rather than fix my design so that the response windows would never overlap, I decided to write a function that would collect a one-off keyboard response, asynchronously, meaning that other experiment control code can run behind it. Read the rest of this entry »

Some examples of web-based experiments

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Since more an more folks are running web-based experiments (typically, via Amazon’s Mechanical Turk or other platforms), I thought I’d put together a little sampling of demo experiments. We’ll keep updating this periodically, so feel free to subscribe to the RSS feed. Note that not all of the paradigms listed below have been developed by HLP Lab members (for credits, see below). We might release some of our paradigms for use by others soon. If you’re interested, please leave a comment below and subscribe to this page. This is the easiest way for us to make sure to keep you in the loop. Thank you for understanding. Read the rest of this entry »

Using pyjamas to program external Mechanical Turk experiments

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I recently set up my first external Mechanical Turk study. My greatest friend and foe in this process was pyjamas, a Python-to-Javascript compiler and Widget Set API. THE great advantage of using pyjamas: you can program your entire experiment in python, and pyjamas will create the browser-dependent javascript code. If you already know javascript, writing your experiment in python without having to worry about browser-dependent issues will save you time. And if you don’t, you don’t have to go through the frustrating process of learning javascript. On the downside, the documentation for pyjamas is currently not very good, so figuring out how to get things to work can take a while.

That’s why I’m providing the (commented) code that I generated to create my MechTurk experiment. A short demo version of the experiment can be found here.

If you find this code helpful, please consider acknowledging it via the following URL in your paper/presentation to spread the word:
https://hlplab.wordpress.com/2011/12/25/using-pyjamas-to-program-external-mechanical-turk-experiments/

A screenshot of the experiment. Participants were asked to rate on a 7-point scale how natural the statement they heard was as a description of the scene.

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